Recession Fundraising Series – Pt 1: Recession Proof Fundraising

Marc Pitman, author of Ask Without Fear and the Fundraising Coach Blog, wrote recently about recession proof fundraising and I am going to share his words of wisdom in the first of my Recession Fundraising Series

He starts on a positive note:

Weak economies can be very helpful for nonprofits. During such times, organizations are forced to be leaner and more efficient. When the economy rebounds, they’re in a much better position to take advantage of it

But he warns that:

many nonprofits make bad choices that limit their growth. Some of these mistakes can prove fatal.

So the Pitman offers advice on 3 fatal mistakes fundraisers need to avoid and these are:

Spend less on fundraising : Less investment can result in less being raised which leads to further cuts and even less raised. Tighten budgets where necessary but be very careful when making cuts to fundraising programs.

Become pessimistic: The minute they (fundraisers) start being gloomy, people begin holding on to their wallets…We need to continue to shed light on the good things happening around us…we do need to continue to see the silver lining

Apologize when you’re asking : Timidity is a sure-fire way to not raise money…(its not about)  being brash or arrogant…understanding of people’s financial realities can make them even stronger proponents of our organizations in the future. Whether the economy is soft or strong, one sure way to raise less money is to stop asking for it!

You can read the full article here and also check out Pitman’s Ask Without Fear book here

5 thoughts on “Recession Fundraising Series – Pt 1: Recession Proof Fundraising

  1. Thanks so much for getting the word out about this! Nonprofits are needed more than ever.

    It’s good to have your blog supporting such an important sector!

  2. Pingback: Recession Fundraising Series - Pt 2: 3rd Sector Funding & The Economy « Conor’s Fundraising Blog

  3. Excellent article.

    For another idea for simple to manage fundraising, which also helps others in this current economic climate, is to also consider Fundraising Discount Cards.

    In a nutshell, you buy plastic credit card type cards, which could have your church/fundraiser/charity logo on the front & approx 12 to 20 local merchants offering discounts on the back, you sell these at a profit (obviously), but also the person buying the card actually has more than the value of the card in discounts – win/win.

    Example: you buy card for $2, sell card for $10, & person buying has in excess of $10 worth of discounts.

    Some of the better companies offer to get the merchants for you (saves the headache of doing it yourself) & some don’t even ask for payment until 2 weeks later, so you could effectively pay for the cards out of the profit you’ve already made! – http://locatereviews.com/852550389

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  5. Excellent article.

    For another idea for simple to manage fundraising, which also helps others in this current economic climate, is to also consider Fundraising Discount Cards.

    In a nutshell, you buy plastic credit card type cards, which could have your church/fundraiser/charity logo on the front & approx 12 to 20 local merchants offering discounts on the back, you sell these at a profit (obviously), but also the person buying the card actually has more than the value of the card in discounts – win/win.

    Example: you buy card for $2, sell card for $10, & person buying has in excess of $10 worth of discounts.

    Some of the better companies offer to get the merchants for you (saves the headache of doing it yourself) & some don’t even ask for payment until 2 weeks later, so you could effectively pay for the cards out of the profit you’ve already made!

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